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Lesson Plan - Writing

Miss Nelson is Missing

Grade 4

 

Claudia Richardson

 

NE Standards:

4.2.1                   By the end of the fourth grade, the student will identify, describe, and apply knowledge of the structure of the English language and standard English conventions for sentence structure, usage, punctuation, capitalization and spelling.

4.2.3                 By the end of the fourth grade, students will demonstrate improvement in organization, content, word choice (vocabulary), voice, sentence fluency and standard English conventions after revising and editing their compositions.

4.2.4                 By the end of the fourth grade, students will use a variety of forms to write for different audiences and purposes.

4.3.2                 By the end of the fourth grade, students will make oral presentations that demonstrate appropriate consideration of audience, purpose, and information to be conveyed.

4.4.1                   By the end of the fourth grade, students will identify, describe, and apply knowledge of the structure of the English language and Standard English conventions for sentence structure, usage, punctuation, capitalization, and spelling.

 

Objectives:

·        The students will demonstrate their comprehension of Miss Nelson is Missing by improvising a scene between the children in Room 207 and Miss Nelson.

·        The students will demonstrate their understanding of the writing process by writing a letter to Miss Nelson.

 

Materials:

Miss Nelson is Missing By Harry Allard

 

Procedures:

Anticipatory Set:  Discuss with the class what it is like when you have a substitute teacher.  Discuss how the students behave and why.  Read the story Miss Nelson is Missing aloud to the class.

 

Vocabulary: 

rude

ugly

secret

gobbled

spitballs

rapped

detective

squirmed

hissed

refused

change

swarm

discouraged

 

closest

 

 

Activities:

1.       Discuss how the students in Room 207 acted when Miss Nelson was there and when she was gone.

2.     Divide the class into small groups and have them improvise a scene between the children in Room 207.  Have different groups perform scenes from when she was there and when she was gone.

3.     Discuss with the children why the students in Room 207 would want Miss Nelson to return to class.  (Organize their ideas.)

4.     Review the proper format for writing a letter.

5.     Have the children write a letter to Miss Nelson asking her to return to class.  Encourage them to give reasons why Miss Nelson should come back.  (rough draft)

6.     Have the students share their rough drafts for response, editing and revising, and mechanics check.

7.     Have the students polish the letter and compose a final draft.

 

Provisions for special needs:  Perhaps instead of having the students use improvisation, have them write a script for their performance.  Before writing the letter have the student "talk out" the composition before beginning to write.  Reassure the student that when drafting the letter that spelling and other mechanics are not important.  When revising have the students work in groups and focus on compliments.

 

Closure: 

Display the letters around a stuffed figure of Miss Nelson on a bulletin board.

 

 

Assessment: 

          Create a checklist or rubric that considers the following:

1.       Student response to prompt

2.     Demonstration of appropriate letter structure

3.     Use of conventional spelling and grammar

4.     Use of lively, descriptive language

 

References: 

          Miss Nelson is Missing by Harry Allard

          Reading Beyond the Basal:  Miss Nelson is Missing by Victoria Valdez

If You're Trying to Teach Kids How to Write…you've gotta have this book!  By Marjorie Frank

Language Arts 4th ed by Gail Tompkins

 

Reflection: