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Lesson Plan

 

I see the moon,
The moon sees me,
God bless the moon,
And God bless me.

Nursery Rhyme

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National Science Standards
National Math Standards
Grade Level: 2 and up
Time
: 2 or 3 class sessions
 

NE Standards:
1.5.3 By the end of first grade, students will develop an understanding of the changes in the earth and sky.
4.2.1 By the end of fourth grade, students will develop the abilities needed to do scientific inquiry.
4.5.2 By the end of fourth grade, students will develop an understanding of objects in the sky.
4.5.3 By the end of fourth grade, students will develop an understanding of the changes in the earth and sky.
8.5.3 By the end of eighth grade, students will develop an understanding of the earth in the solar system.

Objectives:

to recognize and describe the patterns of the Moon's phases. 
to generate a birthday moon for student  birth date this year and the previous year using given web sites. 
to classify birthday moon
to predict moon phase for next year's birthday

Vocabulary

phases

waxing

waning

full moon

gibbous

quarter

crescent

new moon

 Materials/Technologies:  (click on linked for printable worksheets)

Procedures: 

I.  Springboard:  Ask students to write a feeling they have experienced regarding the moon.  
Ask students to recall stories they may have heard or read about the moon.
Read aloud Owl Moon
Introduce the word phases.  
Distribute Moon Phases diagram and discuss that the moon does not always look the same.
Ask students what they think the moon looked like on their birthdays.
Instruct students to:

  1. Go to http://saatel.it/users/lore/moon.html to find out what the Moon looked like
    or will look like
    on your birthday this year.
  2. Draw what the Moon looked like on your birthday this year and  last year. 
  3. Place the pictures for this year's birthday moons on the Moon Graph.

  T: Ask the following questions:

  • How many pictures are in each phase? 
  • Which phase has the most pictures? 
  • Which phase has the least pictures? 
  • Which phase contains (student name)'s picture? 
  • Would you put any pictures in a different category (phase)? If yes, why?   

Find what the Moon looked like on the day you were born.  Draw a picture of it.

  •   Do you think that the Moon will look the same on your birthday next year?  Why or why not? 

  •   Draw a picture about what the Moon will look like on your birthday next year. Tell the class why you chose to draw the Moon this way. 

* Go back to the web site and determine if your predictions were correct.

Extensions:

If time and technology is available, have students look at many birthday moons for different years to make more pattern comparisons and predictions.  Start with how the Moon looked on the day they were born.  The pictures and graphs created should be compared to show that the Moon will be different on their birthdays every year.  Some of the questions above could be used.

Place pictures of moon phases on a blank calendar for the current month.  Look at the pictures and determine how many pictures are in each phase.  Which have the most pictures?  Which have the least?  

II.  Distribute moon phases cut and paste pages.  Instruct students to place the moon phase pictures in the correct box on the paste page.

Closure:  Students predict what the moon will look like tomorrow, next week, a year from today.

Assessment:  Students accurately predict what the moon will like on their next birthdays.

Students correctly place pictures of moon phases by titles on cut-and-paste activity.

 

References:  http://153.90.193.71/ceres/demo/moon/html/birthday1.htm

 

Dr. Merryellen Towey Schulz            College of Saint Mary            Teaching Natural/Social Sciences

 

 

 email Dr. Schulz

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